Snoring & Sleep Apnea

INSIGHT INTO SLEEPING DISORDERS AND SLEEP APNEA

45 percent of normal adults snore at least occasionally and 25 percent are habitual snorers. Problem snoring is more frequent in males and overweight people and usually worsens with age. Snoring may be an indication of obstructed breathing and should not be taken lightly. Our otolaryngologists can help you to determine where the anatomic source of your snoring may be, and offer solutions for this noisy and often embarrassing behavior.

WHAT CAUSES SNORING?

The noisy sounds of snoring occur when there is an obstruction to the free flow of air through the passages at the back of the mouth and nose. This area is the collapsible part of the airway where the tongue and upper throat meet the soft palate and uvula. Snoring occurs when these structures strike each other and vibrate during breathing.

 

In children, snoring may be a sign of problems with the tonsils and adenoids. A chronically snoring child should be examined by our otolaryngologists, who may recommend a tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy to return the child to full health.

WHAT IS OBSTRUCTIVE SLEEP APNEA?

Snoring may be a sign of a more serious condition known as obstructive sleep apnea (OSA).  OSA is characterized by multiple episodes of breathing pauses greater than 10 seconds at a time, due to upper airway narrowing or collapse. This results in lower amounts of oxygen in the blood, which causes the heart to work harder. It also causes disruption of the natural sleep cycle, which makes people feel poorly rested despite adequate time in bed. Apnea patients may experience 30 to 300 such events per night.

The immediate effect of sleep apnea is that the snorer must sleep lightly and keep the throat muscles tense in order to keep airflow to the lungs. Because the snorer does not get a good rest, he or she may be sleepy during the day, which impairs job performance and makes him or her a hazardous driver or equipment operator. Untreated obstructive sleep apnea increases the risk of developing heart attacks, strokes, diabetes and many other medical problems.*

For more information on snoring and sleep apnea, please contact our office for a consultation with our otolaryngologists.

*http://www.entnet.org/?q=node/1418

 

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